Tykes & Teens: Technoference, and how it's really affecting your child right now!

Remove The Stigma, Remove the Shame
CALL TO ACTION
 
Dear Moms For Mental Health,
 
Tykes & Teens is declaring September 23rd "Ditch The Device" Day in our community. Why? Because we cannot afford to fail to pay attention to our children when youth suicide rates have increased significantly, making it the second leading cause of death for individuals ages 15-25. Studies conducted by the Center on Addiction found that when children have healthy connected relationships with parents they experience more open lines of communication and are less likely to engage in risky behaviors. Ditch the Device Day encourages family members to put away their devices and "disconnect to connect" as they engage in everyday activity. We will be giving away cell phone "sleeping bags" to help support your efforts to DITCH THE DEVICE!
WHAT'S NEW IN MENTAL HEALTH
Here is yet another phenomenon in the age of technology...
"Technoference: the interruptions in interpersonal
communication caused by attention paid to personal technological devices"- Miriam Webster
 
Learn More!
ASK AGNIESZKA
 
Dear Dr. Marshall,
My husband and I recently experienced a death in the family. While we are all doing our work in grief counseling, I was wondering what you would suggest for me to do as I support my teen in her grief?
 
Dear Mom For Mental Health,
Let me begin by expressing my condolences for your loss. The first thing that comes to mind is something I heard during a recent meeting of clinical supervisors, and that is to "hold the space for the emotion" of the individual. This simply means inviting someone to express themselves while you allow that emotion sit in the space without judgement. Further, you must avoid the temptation to analyze, attempt to fix, or otherwise "poke" at that feeling. With the instinct to want to fix everything for our kids, this is easier said then done.
 
Grief is personal and everyone experiences it uniquely. I recommend a parent allow for whatever your teen needs. Some parents don't want their child to attend a funeral, however, there can be a lot of peace and closure in this ritual. What might be scary for one child in their grief may be therapeutic to another. For teens in particular, grief can be characterized by larger existential questions like "why did this have to happen?" and as a parent it is o.k. to let them know that you don't have all the answers.
 
I know I am giving very broad suggestions, but grief is unpredictable and while there are cycles of grief, those cycles do not follow a strict pattern.
 
In summary:
  • Be present (even in the silence) and check in frequently
  • Acknowledge, accept, allow the feelings and thoughts that come forth from your teen, even if it feels like a roller coaster
  • Encourage your teen to process, honor the memories, seek closure and understanding
  • Check in with a therapist and other adults in your child's life to have your finger on the pulse of how she is doing
  • Make sure basic needs are managed well: eating, sleeping, socializing, family time, etc
 
IF YOU HAVE A QUESTION YOU'D LIKE TO SEE FEATURED, PLEASE SUBMIT BELOW
 
IF YOU ARE NOT A MOM FOR MENTAL HEALTH BUT WOULD LIKE TO BE, CLICK THE LINK BELOW
 
 
Moms for Mental Health is a community wide public awareness campaign with three straightforward goals:
  1. Build an army of members with solid, useful, trusted information and resources regarding children’s mental health.
  2. Distribute the 10 Signs and Signals that can be red light warning signs of mental health problems in children and teens.
  3. Help remove the shame and stigma associated with getting help.
 
CORRESPONDENCE SPONSORED BY
New CORE Logo
RESOURCES AND EVENTS
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Tykes and Teens | 3577 SW Corporate Parkway, Palm City, FL 34990